Setting Up Your Practice June 1 Register Now!

Blog

Musings about movement, whole food nutrition, and mental heath.

Kinesiology Grads Are Not Ready For Professional Practice

Kin grads are not ready for professional practice!

I know this first hand after teaching in a college program here in Ontario in the fall and winter of 2018. It was not an easy experience! The fourth year kin students in that program were not ready to start seeing clients after graduation. There was SO much they didn't yet know about professional practice!

The students were pretty upset when they realized this. There were quite a few heated discussions during that class! It wasn't their fault that they were in this position and we cannot place any blame on the college’s curricula design either. And that's ok.

 I was in the very same position over 25 years ago (!). My co-op terms at the University of Waterloo helped me realize not only what areas of kinesiology I was interested in, but also how poorly I was being prepared for the professional world while at school.

In my co-op terms I worked in as wide a range of positions as I could find. I started in a residential...

Continue Reading...

Is Kinesiology A Doomed Profession?

I fear kinesiology is a doomed profession.

With the number of college and university kinesiology programs currently just in Ontario, we graduate WAY more potential kinesiologists than physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage therapy, chiropractic, medicine, or osteopathy combined!

Our professional ranks should be growing exponentially every year! In fact, they are barely holding and, unfortunately, some years they are even contracting.

The decisions by kinesiology program graduates and former licensed kinesiologists to move on to other health professions are in no way made lightly. I’ve spoken to many kins in different stages of their career who have been quite upset when needing to consider such a big leap away from their desired career path.

Often, in the early years, parents can be a big influence in decision making. Sometimes well-meaning parents are quick to discourage a career as (what they understand to be) a fitness instructor or a personal trainer and push their...

Continue Reading...

I Wish I'd Taken My Own Advice

I was a vegetarian and then a vegan for over 10 years. My mental health took a nosedive. I gradually became more and more depressed!

It started in university when I realized that if I didn't buy meat, chicken, fish, eggs, milk, butter, or cheese I would save A LOT of money. I managed this for the last two and a half years of university and continued it for years afterwards.

What I wasn't aware of were the years of declining mental health and my significantly difficulty with mood regulation, focus, concentration, and memory. I couldn't see any of this because I was standing in it!

 I slowly added meat when I finally understood how significant my depression was and that it was really affecting my ability to run my sport medicine and rehabilitation centre and work with my seven employees.

 Adding animal products back into my diet felt like someone turned the lights back on in my brain! I began feeling SO much better in just days. Clearly I was suffering from a range of...

Continue Reading...

Vegetarian or Vegan?

It's a sticky topic - one involving much debate, controversy, and discussion about ethics and morality. Holistic nutritionists support a plant based diet composed of whole foods.

Based my assessment, I could tell whether a client was following a sustainable vegetarian or vegan diet, or if they should consider adding a few servings of meat, poultry, fish, or eggs to their meal plan. Some clients appreciated this advice, while others decided not to work with me because my recommendations did not align with their values. And it's all ok.

 So - 'plant based' could mean a diet composed entirely of plants or it could mean that you consume animal protein perhaps only at dinner.

When I explained it to people this way, they realize that they could eat say, five to seven servings of meat per week, and they would be eating mostly plants. Done.

The next thing we discuss is the number of servings per week each of meat, poultry, and fish. Can they try to...

Continue Reading...

Nuts, Diabetes Management,
and Big Pharma?

Nuts Are Really Good For You!
 
Adding a handful of nuts to your daily diet is a good way of managing fasting blood sugar levels says a study in the March 2019 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: https://tgam.ca/2VB90wK
 
Nuts also greatly decrease fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance. This is the body's way of preventing insulin from helping sugar into the cells where it is needed for normal energy production.
 
Health Canada Has Set Acceptable Blood Sugar Levels Too High
 
In this article however, one of the main reasons why so many people (upwards of 50%! of us) will be diagnosed with diabetes in our lifetime is that Health Canada states an actual diagnosis of diabetes doesn't happen until sugar levels are 7.0 mmol/L or higher! This is WAY too high!!
 
In fact, according to Mosby's Canadian Manual of Diagnostics and Laboratory Tests, acceptable levels of blood sugar are 4 to 6 mmol/L. In nutrition school, we are...
Continue Reading...

Getting Started With A
Well Designed Exercise Program

How To Begin

There are many kinds of exercises, put together into a variety of exercise programs, for many different reasons. The key is understanding what your ultimate goal is and to integrate complementary exercises in a way that achieves your objective.

Are you trying to recover from an injury? Prepare your body for surgery? Want to get strong? Train for an athletic event? Improve your balance and stability? Stand up from a chair on your first try? Get ready to have a baby? Rebound after cancer treatment?

 

The Purpose of a Well Designed Exercise Program

Regardless of your reason for needing a well designed exercise program, there are common goals that every exercise professional understands and will implement for every one of their clients.

Your fitness coach will work with you to design a personalized program that will:

  • Teach proper abdominal activation and pelvic/trunk stabilization with a neutral spine;
  • Help to move the scapulae and the pelvis without moving the...
Continue Reading...

Dysbiosis, ‘Leaky Gut Syndrome’, and
Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO)

What is Dysbiosis or 'Leaky Gut Syndrome'?

The upper part to the small intestine is designed to be almost free of bacteria. When bacterial levels increase and this bacteria (microflora) chemistry is altered, toxic compounds are produced by the bacterial breakdown of food. This has been shown by Russian scientist Elie Metchnikoff to cause a wide range of degenerative diseases.

“Alterations in the bowel flora and its activities are now believed to be contributing factors to many chronic and degenerative diseases. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis have all been linked to alterations in the intestinal microflora.

The intestinal dysbiosis hypothesis suggests a number of factors associated with modern Western living have a detrimental impact on the microflora of the gastrointestinal tract.

Factors such as antibiotics, psychological and physical stress, and certain dietary components have been found to contribute to...

Continue Reading...

Navigating Care for People
with Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

Community Care for Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

Navigating services for a loved one who has been diagnosed with dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, early stage Alzheimer’s, or Alzheimer’s can be scary and feel overwhelming. In reality, when accessing support for our clients, we found that navigating the care in Toronto is quite simple and the people we spoke with were very understanding and helpful.

 

Connect with a Care Network

In Toronto, this network is the place to start:

Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (LHIN - pronounced 'Lynn'): (416) 506 – 9888

 Contacting the LHIN or a similar health network in your area would be your first step to accessing care.

When you call this group, an assessment coordinator will arrange to send someone directly to your home to do an assessment. The purpose of the assessment is to find out the needs and the support required at this time.

The Ontario government has plans to reorganize community care with a...

Continue Reading...

Healthy Bellies, Exercise, and Self Care

Relaxing Self Care for your Digestive System:

After a flat belly with no bloating, nausea, cramping, or gas? Aren't we all! The key is to make sure that your gut is a cleaned out as much as possible every day.

Another benefit of a cleaned out intestinal tract? It's one of the simplest ways of improving mental performance - whether that's memory, focus, or concentration. 

This means that full and complete bowel movements (something no one really wants to talk about!) are happening at least once a day.

Ideally, within an hour after eating each meal, you should have a full, soft bowel movement that sinks to the bottom of the toilet bowl!

In other words, at least three bowel movements every day that are easy to pass without any significant time sitting on the toilet, is ideal.

There are many ways to relax the intestines and promote better and more frequent bowel movements:

1) Deep breathing: Inhaling through the nose and exhaling through the mouth. Try focusing on this breath as...

Continue Reading...

Gut Health and Digestion
The Emotional Connection

Gut Health and Digestion – The Causes and Emotional Connection

Ideally, we should all have at least one to three bowel movements per day. Allopathic medicine diagnoses constipation when bowel movements occur three times or less per week.

According to holistic health practitioners such as naturopaths, Chinese medicine physicians and holistic nutritionists, if we have any less than one bowel movement per day we are constipated!

Within 30 to 60 minutes after eating, we should have a bowel movement. Eating stimulates the entire digestive system. The transit time of the bowel, or the time it takes for one meal to travel through the digestive tract, is approximately 18 hours.

Make it your habit to routinely sit on the toilet within 30 minutes to an hour after eating breakfast to train your body to relax the bowels and have a bowel movement. Your bowel movement should be soft and easy to pass with clean up being quite easy!

 

Use a 'Squatty Potty'

Consider adding a foot stool...

Continue Reading...
1 2
Close

50% Complete

Join Our Mail List

Keep up to date on blog posts from our team members, new courses, special download offers, and lots more!